March 2, 2004

Bush Vs. Kerry

So it looks like John Kerry is it.

And therefore Iím out.

I would have voted for John Edwards had the Democratic Party chosen him as the nominee. Heck, I would have voted a straight-Democratic ticket next year if thatís how it went down. But it didnít, and so I wonít. I canít.

Until further notice, this blog officially supports George W. Bush for president in 2004.

I will not be his cheerleader. Though I will defend him from scurrilous charges, I donít like the man, and I never have. I appreciate very much what he has accomplished in the realm of foreign policy, as anyone who reads this blog with any regularity knows. And there is simply no way I can vote for his opponent who has spent the past year whining about every good thing we are doing and have done in the Middle East. This is by far the most important task now and ahead of us.

I am not about to join the right-wing bandwagon. I will support a Democratic Congress as I always have.

The Christian Right can take its hysterical reactionary agenda and stuff it. They are not my comrades, and they should not come looking to me for support. They will get none.

I cannot and will not be a team player for the Republican Party. None of the partisan ďresponsibilitiesĒ apply to me because I do not accept them. When I side with the liberals I am not a ďtraitor.Ē I could be plausibly accused of heresy for siding with conservatives as a Democrat. But thatís because I actually was a Democrat. I am neither a Republican nor a conservative. I will vote a split ticket this year because the way I see it, each party gets some things right. The inverse of that statement is obvious. Each party gets some things wrong.

I hope the Democrats spend the next several years, whether in the White House or out of it, getting themselves a serious foreign policy. Right now they donít have one. Some individual Democrats are exceptionally sharp on this subject. But the party as a whole is lost. It hasnít always been this way, and there is no reason to expect it to remain this way forever. I may very well support the Democratic candidate in 2008. It depends on who they nominate, and it depends on what happens between now and then.

Itís also entirely possible that John Kerry will win in November and I will come around to his side. He may win and govern well, and if he does, I will notice. Iíll be grateful and relieved.

Until then I oppose him, and I do it without malice. I donít hate the man, and I doubt I ever will. Hatred destroys people emotionally and intellectually. The pitched level of anti-Bush hatred is shocking to me, just as the fury from the right against President Clinton was shocking. The asinine bluster from political haters is surely the dumbest commentary on any subject Iíve ever heard and read from adults. Get a life, haters. This is just politics.

I am the same person I was when I wished Al Gore were president. And if I change my mind about Bush in the meantime, or if I warm to a President Kerry, Iíll be the same person then that I am today. Some people make the funniest judgements about others because of who they support as a president. Itís not until you change your mind about a president that you come to realize how petty that is.

Posted by Michael J. Totten at March 2, 2004 10:25 PM
Winner, The 2007 Weblog Awards, Best Middle East or Africa Blog

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