October 04, 2005

Gemmayze

Not every nice place in Beirut looks like the Middle Eastern amusement park downtown. Much more my style is a scruffy old gentrifying bohemian quarter known as Gemmayze (pronounced Juh-MAY-zee). It’s the “Greenwich Village” of Beirut. Here are some night shots.

Gemmayze at Night 5.jpg

Gemmayze at Night 6.jpg

Gemmayze at Night 7.jpg

Gemmayze Bar at Night.jpg

Posted by Michael J. Totten at October 4, 2005 01:04 PM
Comments

Now I wish I had gone out tonight.
I can't stand Monot St., the street that the guide books mention as the nightclubbing spot. I've never had a fantastic time there.
Contrarily, I always enjoy Gemayze. Even after it fully gentrifies, it will still be nice. And the proximity to the downtown will guarantee success.

Posted by: lebanon.profile at October 4, 2005 01:31 PM

Haha the world is so small. My grandma-grandpa used to live in one of the building you photographed (the one with the coffee shop known as ahwat el 'zez). If I am not mistaken (the picture is dark), it's the building that you can see in the 3rd photo.

Michael, I am sure that everybody keeps telling you that Lebanon is a small place, and now you can see why.

Posted by: Vox P. at October 4, 2005 02:41 PM

Please keep the photographic posts coming.

Posted by: Itiail at October 4, 2005 06:04 PM

I'm surprised the bar is still displaying liqour bottles so close to Ramadan. I live in Indonesia and the bars around here take down the liqour displays and replace it with water and Coke bottles. Of course the liqour is still for sale.

Posted by: Jason at October 4, 2005 07:03 PM

Actuall Gemayze is a Christian neighbourhood so you won't feel any change during Ramadan. Most restaurants remain open in West Beirut, even though they are less crowded. Anyway, there's no fasting after sunset.

Posted by: Vox P. at October 4, 2005 10:09 PM

Hello Michael,

Please do not post my correspondence, this is a personal mail I had to post it on your website as I don't have your personal mail...sorry

Hope you had a nice time here in Barbu Cafe/Pub at Gemmaizeh. Your new comments posted on October 16th troubled me. Was it I who insinuated that you were a spy!!! or were you referring to someone else? If it's me then please do excuse my behaviour. I had no right to do so.

On the other hand, hope to see you soon and Charles too...I didn't read what is written, I am not that much interested by politics so you have to excuse me for that...Having not read therefore I can't comment on your writing.

Finally, the wi-fi is working so you can come and work here if you have a laptop, and the breakfast will be ready provided you call me before hand so that we prepare it for you.

You have my tel. number and my e-mail

Sincerely
Makram

Posted by: Makram Zeenny at October 17, 2005 02:25 AM
Winner, The 2007 Weblog Awards, Best Middle East or Africa Blog

Pajamas Media BlogRoll Member



Testimonials

"I'm flattered such an excellent writer links to my stuff"
Johann Hari
Author of God Save the Queen?

"Terrific"
Andrew Sullivan
Author of Virtually Normal

"Brisk, bracing, sharp and thoughtful"
James Lileks
Author of The Gallery of Regrettable Food

"A hard-headed liberal who thinks and writes superbly"
Roger L. Simon
Author of Director's Cut

"Lively, vivid, and smart"
James Howard Kunstler
Author of The Geography of Nowhere


Contact Me

Send email to michaeltotten001 at gmail dot com


News Feeds




toysforiraq.gif



Link to Michael J. Totten with the logo button

totten_button.jpg


Tip Jar





Essays

Terror and Liberalism
Paul Berman, The American Prospect

The Men Who Would Be Orwell
Ron Rosenbaum, The New York Observer

Looking the World in the Eye
Robert D. Kaplan, The Atlantic Monthly

In the Eigth Circle of Thieves
E.L. Doctorow, The Nation

Against Rationalization
Christopher Hitchens, The Nation

The Wall
Yossi Klein Halevi, The New Republic

Jihad Versus McWorld
Benjamin Barber, The Atlantic Monthly

The Sunshine Warrior
Bill Keller, The New York Times Magazine

Power and Weakness
Robert Kagan, Policy Review

The Coming Anarchy
Robert D. Kaplan, The Atlantic Monthly

England Your England
George Orwell, The Lion and the Unicorn